FAQs

Q?

Who is a good candidate for your DBT groups?

A.

DBT has been proven effective for a host of behaviors that may be the result of emotional dysregulation, including cutting and other forms of self- injurious behaviors, impulse control difficulties, disruptive behaviors, and eating disorders, to name a few.

Q?

How would I encourage someone to join your DBT group?

A.

It can be challenging to maintain a healthy relationship with someone who experiences difficulties managing their emotions.  However, it is also common that those who experience these difficulties are often in a great deal of pain.  Presenting the idea of DBT group participation as a data driven and empirically validated program that has been demonstrated to help decrease suicidal and self-injurious behaviors, intense and often painful emotions, and difficulties managing interpersonal relationships often results in feelings of hope.

Q?

What is the link between DBT and Borderline Personality Disorder?

A.

We often get clients who ask about the connection between DBT and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), as it is not uncommon for a research inquiry into DBT to result in information about BPD.  DBT was originally created to work with clients who struggled with depressive symptoms, difficulty managing intense emotions, and suicidal behaviors.  While it was initially developed to work with this population, research has demonstrated effectiveness across a wide range of presenting problems.  You do not need to meet the criteria for BPD to benefit from DBT, and conversely, participating in a DBT group does not mean that you meet the criteria for BPD.

Q?

Are both parents required to attend groups with required parent components?

A.

Participation in skills groups for parents is required for the Pre-Teen Coping and Adolescent DBT groups. While both parents are not required to attend group, we have found that if both parents play a role in care-giving, they have both expressed benefit from attending group.  As parental involvement often provides a shared language, more consistent skills implementation, and a positive shift in overall family dynamics, we encourage both parents to participate, if possible.  We have many parents who attend as a couple, or parents who alternate in attendance, if that is a better fit for the family schedule.  We also have some divorced or separated parents attend group, if there are shared care-giving responsibilities.  There is no additional cost for attendance by both parents.

Q?

Can we bring siblings to the parent class or have them wait in the waiting room?

A.

The parent group is often found to provide a significant source of support for many of the participating parents.  In an effort to maintain the necessary level of confidentiality as well as allow it to continue to serve as a source of support, siblings are not allowed to attend the parent class.  Siblings who are well-behaved and do not require supervision are welcome to wait in our kid-friendly waiting areas.

Q?

Can we start at one location and when a spot opens up, move to the other one for convenience?

A.

To the degree that we are able, group membership is assigned based on ease of accessibility as well as the composition of the current group—age range and/or level of severity of group members, for example.  Once clients are placed in a group, they have consistency with peers participating in the group as well as group leaders and are exposed to the skills modules on a different time frame than other groups.  All Adolescent DBT Groups cover the same material, but not at the same time.   For the above reasons, we ask that clients and teens remain at the same location for the duration of group.

Q?

Why is ongoing individual therapy required while participating in group?

A.

Most of our DBT groups are skills based; as a result, group time is spent focusing on skill development rather than processing daily events or current concerns. Consequently, we ask that participants be in individual therapy in order to have a space in which they can gain support around daily concerns and review skills utilization as well.  While we do require that clients be in ongoing individual therapy, it does not need to be weekly, nor does the individual therapist need to be a clinician at Southeast Psych.

Q?

When are your groups held?

A.

Adolescent DBT with Dr. Heidi Limbrunner & Dr. Amanda McGough

July 31 – December 4, Tuesdays @ 6:15 – 7:15 pm at the Ballantyne office

Sixteen sessions divided into four modules of four sessions each. Typically a module will run four weeks followed by a one week break. Call for specific dates & prices.

 

Adolescent DBT with Dr. Kristin Daley & Dr. Heather Wright

August 22 – January 9, Wednesdays @ 6-7pm at the Southpark office

Sixteen sessions divided into four modules of four sessions each. Typically a module will run four weeks followed by a one week break. Call for specific dates & prices.

 

Young Adult DBT with Dr. Heather Wright

August 22 – October 10, Wednesdays @ 5-6pm at the Southpark office

ages 18-29